San Diego jarred by latest development on housing

These are days of high anxiety and potential opportunity on the housing front in San Diego.


Some recent turns of events have energized discussions over high housing prices, low housing stock and whether too many homes are being allowed in certain neighborhoods.


Add to that the increasing concerns about corporations dominating the homebuying market.
Here’s what has surfaced in just the past two weeks:


• The Navy is considering building up to 10,000 housing units in high-rises and major commercial and office space at its current NAVWAR site along Coast Highway on the edge of the Midway District.


• Blackstone Group, the private equity giant, purchased some 5,800 apartments from the Conrad Prebys Foundation.


• The county Board of Supervisors is considering assessing fees in “car-centric” areas in a continuing effort to channel development into more urbanized areas that have shorter commutes and accessible transit.


• Mid-City residents are protesting policies encouraging additional dwelling units, often called granny flats, that could double or triple — or more — the number of housing units in neighborhoods designed for single-family homes.
The latter may be the housing version of big things coming in small packages. That’s good or bad, depending on one’s point of view.

The latter may be the housing version of big things coming in small packages. That’s good or bad, depending on one’s point of view.


Additional dwelling units (ADUs), sometimes called casitas, have dotted San Diego’s neighborhoods for generations. They’ve seemed relatively benign because there weren’t that many of them and they had a historic, even cute, familiarity as granny flats, a name housing advocates are trying to phase out.
The steady increase of the small homes largely has gone under the radar in the housing wars, which tend to focus on massive developments and legislative proposals in Sacramento to essentially upzone the entire state in an effort to get more housing built. Not too long ago, government regulations made them difficult to build, if not discouraged entirely

read more at: https://enewspaper.sandiegouniontribune.com/desktop/sdut/default.aspx?pubid=ee84df93-f3c1-463c-a82f-1ab095a198ca

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