ALERT: Destructive ‘super-termites’ discovered in La Mesa

termite

Homeowners in La Mesa are being warned their houses could be at risk of a destructive pest: Formosan subterranean termites.

San Diego-based company Thrasher Termite & Pest Control made the unfortunate discovery this month in a La Mesa home.

“Unlike native subterranean termites, the termites we observed were extremely active, didn’t flee when disturbed, and the soldiers went into attack mode. They had hollowed out large areas of structural wood, always staying just beneath the exterior paint and unnoticed by the homeowner,” said Garrett Thrasher.

They’re deemed “super-termites” due to enormous colonies up to two million strong. The pests can cause significant structural damage within six months unlike traditional dry-wood termites, which take 10-15 years to do similar damage.

read more at: https://www.10news.com/news/destructive-super-termites-discovered-in-la-mesa

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What is next for homes of the future

robot

Smart home technology is becoming increasingly important to both developers – through their apartment plans – and the Australian consumer – as a way to save on energy bills.

But for LG, the next step in smart homes is all about artificial intelligence (or AI), with its idea first outlined at the technology fair CES 2018 in Las Vegas, and with more details coming at the IFA Global Innovations Show.

Does this mean after years of being yelled at, your television will finally start yelling back? Well, not really – although if you ask your smart speaker nicely, it will sing for you.

The proposed idea is that while refrigerators, televisions, dishwashers, washing machines and lights could respond to voice commands, they might also learn from your daily habits to the extent that they’ll already know what to do before you tell them.

It won’t involve needing to learn a whole new operating system, either. Senior director of LG Global Communications, Ken Hong, said that the key to success was complementing existing technology, and embracing tech that buyers were already familiar with.

read more at: https://www.domain.com.au/living/a-refrigerator-that-can-think-whats-next-for-the-homes-of-the-future-20180814-h13r44-758057/?utm_campaign=strap-masthead&utm_source=smh&utm_medium=link&utm_content=pos2&ref=pos1

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The biggest mistake buyers make when purchasing a home

Your home is probably the most expensive thing you’ll ever purchase, but what if you made a mistake about what sort of property would make you happy?

Professor Michael Norton from Harvard Business School, co-author of Happy Money: The New Science of Smarter Spending, says when choosing a home, many of us unwisely prioritize physical aspects.

“It can be wiser to spend time and money finding a community rather than a third bathroom,” he says.

Research from Harvard University shows that when college students were randomly assigned to dorm rooms, most believed they would be happier in a bigger, more beautiful house.

However, the degree of social connection in the accommodation they landed had the biggest impact on their happiness, not its physical qualities.

According to Sam Robinson, who runs the annual Neighbour Day campaign, the importance of community cannot be overstated.

read more at: https://www.domain.com.au/living/why-our-dream-homes-might-not-make-us-happy-in-the-long-run-20180814-h13qeo-758075/?utm_campaign=strap-masthead&utm_source=smh&utm_medium=link&utm_content=pos5&ref=pos1

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