San Diego home price stays at $570k

San Diego County’s record-breaking home price was unchanged in May at $570,000, increasing 7.6 percent in a year, real estate tracker CoreLogic reported Thursday.

May’s median ends a streak of new records each month for the county home price, with $570,000 still being the highest of all time.

The majority of May’s increase was led by resale single-family homes as the resale condo price dipped.

There were 4,004 homes that sold in May, down from 4,155 at the same time last year. It follows a trend throughout Southern California of declining sales as prices reach new records.

CoreLogic analyst Andrew LePage wrote in the report that a limited number of homes for sale and declining affordability for the average buyer is leading to a reduction in sales.

Here’s how the different home types fared:

  • Resale single-family home: Hit an all-time record of $619,500, increasing 5 percent in a year. There were 2,470 sales, down 6.7 percent from the same time last year.
  • Resale condo: Down a half a percent from last month for a median of $428,000 with 1,191 sales, down 6.3 percent from same time last year. The resale condo price has increased 9.5 percent in a year.
  • Newly built homes: New homes and condos hit a median of $696,500 with 343 sales. The price fluctuates more than other home categories because of low supply, a far cry from before the housing crash in 2006 when up to 1,200 new homes sold in a month.

Declining sales comes as there has been an increase in home inventory the past few months. There were 6,090 homes listed for sale in May, up from 5,060 in May 2017 and 5,913 in May 2016, said the Greater San Diego Association of Realtors.

read more at: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/real-estate/sd-fi-home-prices-20180621-story.htmlww.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/real-estate/sd-fi-home-prices-20180621-story.html

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The secret to keeping your bedroom cool on hot summer nights

It’s official – the chill of winter is just a memory and we can emerge from our warm, stuffy burrows to sniff the air and greet the sun. Although summer brings an invigorating feeling of freedom from bundling up in woolly layers and hogging the heater, clammy summer nights frequently impair effective sleep. Here’s how to keep cool in the bedroom and increase all-important rest time.

Love your linen
Bedlinen has a significant effect on sleep quality. In hot weather, the prime factors are breathability, and moisture-wicking, the ability of fabric to draw moisture from skin to outer layers of clothing or release it into the air. Natural fabrics are more effective at this than blends containing polyester or other synthetics. Cotton and linen are superb for breathability, and bamboo has superior moisture-wicking abilities.

Open wide
It’s been proven that a cool bedroom, around 18 to 20°C, promotes restful sleep, even in winter. A well-ventilated room is essential to prevent a stuffy atmosphere that gets warmer during the night. Without resorting to power-hungry air-con, try opening windows to take advantage of lower night temperatures and fresh air.

Tip: If bedroom windows are exposed to full sun during the day, keep them closed and curtains and blinds drawn to stop heat build-up. Open them when the sun goes down and temperatures drop.

read more at: https://www.domain.com.au/living/keep-cool-hot-summer-nights/?benref=smh

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7 ways to create a more energy efficient home

1. Ventilate naturally

Make sure your home has plenty of natural ventilation and light, says Jeff Angel of the Total Environment Centre.

“Cross-ventilation will enable it to get as much airflow through as possible, with cooling breezes in summer that means you don’t have to use airconditioning as much, if at all.”

Orienting a new home carefully and making sure it has a well-designed layout will help, but houses can also be renovated to introduce greater airflow with the use of louvres, too.”

Windows in areas that will see more sunlight, as well as the use of skylights, will also make a home brighter without the need for constant artificial lighting.

2. Seal the home

There are times when you’ll want to seal your house off completely from the outside to maintain a constant temperature inside. That’s when installing good insulation in the roof space and walls, effective water and draught proofing and double-glazing makes all the difference.

“That’s about making your house an excellent esky,” says architect Tone Wheeler of the Environa Studio. “It will help to preserve heat in winter and keep it cool in the hottest part of a mid-summer day.”

read more at: https://www.domain.com.au/advice/seven-ways-to-create-a-more-energyefficient-home-20180528-h10n3s/?utm_campaign=strap-masthead&utm_source=smh&utm_medium=link&ref=pos1