11 small scale, high impact remodeling ideas

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To celebrate the 20th anniversary of our Idea House program, we went back to the drawing board to dream up a different take on what an Idea House could be.

Sunset used the concept of a “make under” as our compass—preserving the spirit of the dwelling’s original design while updating it with minimal structural changes and affordable decor.

The main objective? To create optimal flow and an immediate connection to the outdoors, all with a refined Southern California sensibility.

see the slide show at: https://www.sfgate.com/realestate/article/11-small-scale-high-impact-remodeling-ideas-13390112.php#photo-16499619

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San Diego resale home price gains slow

Existing home prices in July for the San Diego metropolitan area increased 6.2 percent in a year, its slowest pace since January 2017, said the S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller Indices released Tuesday.

San Diego’s price increases were the second-slowest in the West, only ahead of Portland, said the index which studies the metropolitan areas of 20 major cities. The San Diego region still slightly outpaced the national average of 6 percent.

The indices evaluate home prices by more than just price, tracking repeat sales of identical single-family houses as they turn over through the years. It is a favorite of economists, who use it to get a more complete view of the market instead of just the median home price.

Price increases have slowed throughout much of the nation, with experts citing a variety of reasons: A gain in the number of homes for sale, rising mortgage interest rates and rent growth slowing, which may limit some pressure to buy.

“A slight autumn chill has fallen over the housing market, and after an incredibly hot past few years, it’s probably fair to say the cool down is a welcome development for many would-be home buyers,” Zillow senior economist Aaron Terrazas wrote,

Las Vegas led yearly price increases at 13.7 percent, followed by Seattle at 12.1 percent and San Francisco at 10.8 percent.

David Blitzer, managing director of the index, wrote in the report that 15 of the 20 regions studied saw smaller monthly increases than the same time last year (including San Diego). Sales of existing single-family homes are down, he wrote, but residential building permits were up.

“Rising home prices are beginning to catch up with housing,” he said.

Following national trends, San Diego has seen more homes available for purchase over the last few months. In July, there were 7,021 listings in the county, up from 5,828 in July 2017 and 6,571 in July 2016, said the Greater San Diego Association of Realtors.

Mark Goldman, real estate lecturer at San Diego State University, said the local market was strongly affected by increasing interest rates, more so than other parts of the nation, because of higher prices in California.

“Even if the house stayed the same price,” he said, “the house got more expensive because interest rates are higher.”

read more at: https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/real-estate/sd-fi-case-shiller-20180925-story.html

Disclaimer: for information and entertainment purposes only

Does going green net you more when selling your home?

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If you make extensive energy-conservation and other green improvements to your home, will they earn you a premium price for the entire house when you go to sell?

For years, the easy answer has been, oh yeah, absolutely: Green is good, everybody knows that saving energy is a no-brainer, and buyers will pay more to get it. There’s research to back that up. A study of California sales found that green-certified homes sold for between 2.1 percent and 5.3 percent more than similar homes with minimal or no green features. A 2015 study of renovated homes in Washington D.C. concluded the average price premium was around 3.46 percent. A study last year in Texas found that green-certified homes sold for 8 percent more than comparable properties.

If you are in the San Diego area contact the appraisers at www.scappraisals.com ; they are forerunners in green properties appraisals.

Home builders have told researchers that two-thirds of their customers say they’re willing to pay higher prices for homes with significant green features, such as energy-efficient appliances, heavy-duty insulation, water conservation, healthy indoor air quality and others.

So is that it? Going green always nets you more green — case closed? Not so fast. Two recent studies by appraisers with long experience valuing green homes suggest the answer is more nuanced. Some of the researchers’ findings in brief: Though generally it’s true that green improvements will earn you at least a little higher price, the size of the premium may depend on external factors you hadn’t thought about:

  • Does the Realtor you picked to list your home know enough about green improvements to market them effectively? Is the agent competent to market what you’ve got to sell?
  • Does the agent have any formal training in this area, evidenced by a green designation in her or his own listing presentation or advertising?
  • Does the listing for your home in the local Multiple Listing Service (MLS) contain crucial information about your green improvements, such as a “green addendum” that details the special features that make it energy-efficient?
  • Does the local MLS have “green fields” that allow listing brokers to fill in the blanks with appropriate detail so that other agents — the ones who are going to find your buyers — know what your house really offers in terms of green improvements?
  • Do Realtors in the area know much or anything about rating systems such as HERS, LEED, ENERGY STAR or others? Do they know where to turn locally to obtain a rating? (HERS stands for Home Energy Rating System; LEED is a globally recognized rating system for residential and commercial green real estate; ENERGY STAR is a federally developed rating for appliances, building materials, entire houses and commercial property.)

If none of these key factors is working for you, your green features may be impressive, but may not earn you much of a premium. Worst case, they might even get you nothing.

rear more at: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/real-estate-news/article220044410.html

Disclaimer: for information and entertainment purposes only