Tag Archives: appraisal

Does going green net you more when selling your home?

solar

If you make extensive energy-conservation and other green improvements to your home, will they earn you a premium price for the entire house when you go to sell?

For years, the easy answer has been, oh yeah, absolutely: Green is good, everybody knows that saving energy is a no-brainer, and buyers will pay more to get it. There’s research to back that up. A study of California sales found that green-certified homes sold for between 2.1 percent and 5.3 percent more than similar homes with minimal or no green features. A 2015 study of renovated homes in Washington D.C. concluded the average price premium was around 3.46 percent. A study last year in Texas found that green-certified homes sold for 8 percent more than comparable properties.

If you are in the San Diego area contact the appraisers at www.scappraisals.com ; they are forerunners in green properties appraisals.

Home builders have told researchers that two-thirds of their customers say they’re willing to pay higher prices for homes with significant green features, such as energy-efficient appliances, heavy-duty insulation, water conservation, healthy indoor air quality and others.

So is that it? Going green always nets you more green — case closed? Not so fast. Two recent studies by appraisers with long experience valuing green homes suggest the answer is more nuanced. Some of the researchers’ findings in brief: Though generally it’s true that green improvements will earn you at least a little higher price, the size of the premium may depend on external factors you hadn’t thought about:

  • Does the Realtor you picked to list your home know enough about green improvements to market them effectively? Is the agent competent to market what you’ve got to sell?
  • Does the agent have any formal training in this area, evidenced by a green designation in her or his own listing presentation or advertising?
  • Does the listing for your home in the local Multiple Listing Service (MLS) contain crucial information about your green improvements, such as a “green addendum” that details the special features that make it energy-efficient?
  • Does the local MLS have “green fields” that allow listing brokers to fill in the blanks with appropriate detail so that other agents — the ones who are going to find your buyers — know what your house really offers in terms of green improvements?
  • Do Realtors in the area know much or anything about rating systems such as HERS, LEED, ENERGY STAR or others? Do they know where to turn locally to obtain a rating? (HERS stands for Home Energy Rating System; LEED is a globally recognized rating system for residential and commercial green real estate; ENERGY STAR is a federally developed rating for appliances, building materials, entire houses and commercial property.)

If none of these key factors is working for you, your green features may be impressive, but may not earn you much of a premium. Worst case, they might even get you nothing.

rear more at: https://www.miamiherald.com/news/business/real-estate-news/article220044410.html

Disclaimer: for information and entertainment purposes only

San Diego #1 for Solar

After finishing second behind Los Angeles for three consecutive years, San Diego came in first place in the nation as the city with the most installed solar power.

Solar power increased 60 percent in San Diego in 2016, reaching 303 megawatts of installed photo-voltaic capacity, finishing 36 megawatts ahead of Los Angeles and almost 60 percent higher than Honolulu and San Jose, which finished third and fourth.

In the previous report, San Diego racked up enough installed capacity to power 47,000 homes. In the latest rankings, released Tuesday, the number grew to nearly 76,000 homes

Read more at: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/energy-green/sd-fi-solar-report-20170403-story.html

Appraisal Delays are gumming up home loans

Your lender does not have to use a management company (AMC) to order an appraisal.  Contact the appraisers at www.scappraisals.com with your appraisal questions.

There’s trouble brewing in appraiserville — and it’s beginning to cost some unsuspecting homebuyers money. If you’re planning to buy in the coming months, be aware.

The problem is part work overload, part resentment over fees. In many markets, diminishing numbers of experienced appraisers are available — or willing — to handle requests for their work on tight timetables and at fees that are sometimes lower than they earned a decade or more ago.

The net result: The system is getting gummed up. Scheduled home sale settlements are being delayed because banks and appraisal management companies can’t find appraisers who’ll do valuations on timetables needed for closing dates in realty contracts. A recent survey of agents by the National Association of Realtors found that appraisal problems were connected with 27 percent of delayed home sale closings, up from 16 percent earlier this year.

In some cases, panicked lenders and management companies are offering appraisers fat bonuses and “rush fees” just to complete valuations to meet deadlines. The extra charges can range anywhere from $200 to $1,000 or more, turning $500 appraisals into $1,200 or $1,500 expenses that typically get paid by homebuyers.

Take this example from a mortgage broker in the Seattle area. Matt Culp, owner of Bainbridge Lending Group, says clients who urgently needed to close on a newly built house — and to move out of their rented dwelling — were squeezed into paying $2,000 for an appraisal that normally would cost $625.

read more at: http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/realestate/ct-re-0918-kenneth-harney-column-20160913-story.html