Tag Archives: san diego

Flat fee real estate listers launch in San Diego

British real estate company Monday launched a flat fee home listing service in San Diego County, charging sellers $3,200 to list a home.

The cost is likely cheaper for most sellers who are used to a 2.5 percent listing fee, so the offer could save sellers hundreds of dollars in commission costs.

Purplebricks, with its flat fee, adds to a growing number of companies that are lowering commission fees in the competitive Southern California housing market.

Eric Eckardt, CEO of Purplebricks’ U.S. operation, said the company offers as much, or more, than a traditional real estate brokerage. Low listing fees are sometimes associated with agencies that don’t do much for clients.

“The flat rate obviously is a great value,” he said. “Home sellers get 3-D virtual tours, a full-service offering, professional photography and a local real estate expert that actually shows up at the house and works with them throughout the process.”

A typical listing fee is about 2.5 percent of the sale cost, and an additional 2.5 percent for the buyer’s agent.

For a median priced home in San Diego County, $540,000 in November, a seller could save roughly $10,000 on listing commission fees.

read more at: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/real-estate/sd-fi-purplebricks-launch-20180108-story.html

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San Diego – Time of use rates for solar give batteries a boost

What ‘time of use’ means

At the beginning of this month, San Diego Gas & Electric instituted new TOU rates.

Approved by the California Public Utilities Commission, TOU pricing fluctuates to encourage customers to run appliances and devices that consume a lot of energy — such as air conditioners and washer/dryers — when demands on the power grid are not as high.

For example, SDG&E offers residential solar customers a couple of TOU options, dividing the hours of the day into peak, off-peak and “super” off-peak time frames

Here’s the breakdown on weekdays:

  • On-peak: 4 p.m. to 9 p.m.
  • Off-peak: 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 9 p.m. to midnight
  • Super Off-peak: Midnight to 6 a.m.

And here’s the pricing that SDG&E offers households with a solar energy system during the summer months (June through October) when the grid often gets stressed from things like higher air conditioning usage:

  • On-peak: 54.2 cents per kilowatt hour
  • Off-peak: 27.9 cents per kilowatt hour
  • Super Off-peak: 21.9 cents per kilowatt hour

The price differential during winter months (November through May) is much less dramatic — just two cents per kilowatt hour separating On-peak and Super Off-peak.

But clearly, during the summer months, there’s a big financial incentive for customers to use power during off-peak and super off-peak hours.

What it means for solar customers

And that has an effect on the approximately 120,000 SDG&E customers with rooftop solar systems that produce electricity during the course of the day.

“In this new world order, when you use energy is as important as how much energy you use,” said Daniel Sullivan, CEO of Sullivan Solar Power.

read more at: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/business/energy-green/sd-fi-solar-batteries-20171219-story.html

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SDG&E and city-run alternative compete to provide 100 percent green power in San Diego

The government-run alternative to San Diego Gas & Electric, known as community choice aggregation, is getting some competition from the investor-owned utility.

To reach its goal of using 100 percent green energy by 2035, the city of San Diego has been looking at establishing a community choice program for more than a year.

Now Mayor Kevin Faulconer’s office has said it will also study a plan submitted by SDG&E for going all green within the next two decades.

“We’re excited to transition San Diego to 100 percent renewable energy, and research done this year identified two programs that could help us get there,” said city spokesman Greg Block.

Under community choice, SDG&E would continue to operate the electrical grid and charge for deliver power, but elected officials would assume control of the buying and selling of that electricity from power plants to city customers.

Ratepayers can opt out of the government-run program if they prefer the utility’s rates, potentially creating competition between the two entities.

The utility’s counter proposal to community choice is expected to be released to the public in the next two weeks.

read more at: http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/environment/sd-me-sdge-plan-20171120-story.html

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