Tag Archives: home maintainance

Preventative Maintenance On Your Home

It’s a corollary of Murphy’s Law: When you are least able to afford a major expense, something big is bound to break down. The solution: Take preventive action before a breakdown turns into an emergency. To help you plan ahead, we give you an overview of what to expect for six major items. (Note: Total cost is for a 2,000-square-foot home or to install a single unit.)

Does the condition of the “moving parts” of your home effect value?  Contact the appraisers at www.scappraisals.com for your value questions.

FURNACE/BOILER

Expected life: Boiler, 13 to 21 years; furnace, 15 to 20 years.

Total cost: Forced-air furnace, $1,693 to $2,020; split system, $1,604 to $2,290; oil boiler, $2,773 to $3,069.

It’s time if: You need frequent repairs or have rising energy bills, rooms that are consistently too hot or cold, humidity problems, or excessive noise. If your furnace or boiler is more than 15 years old, an energy-efficient replacement will cut your utility bills.

Where to start: Use search tools at the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (http://www.acca.org) and Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors Association (http://www.phccweb.org).

Read more at: http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/realestate/home/sns-201302211800–tms–kplngmpctnkm-a20130308-20130308,0,5453154.story

Disclaimer: for information and entertainment purposes only

Winter – Home Chore Check List

Ready to hunker down for winter? Not so fast. Now’s the time to tackle a few chores that will help your house and yard ride out the cold season ahead. Here are a few to check off your to-do list.

Clean the gutters

Gutters and downspouts direct rainwater away from your house. That keeps water from pooling around the foundation and leaking into the basement, or freezing in the gutters at the roof line and causing damaging ice dams.

But those gutters and downspouts can’t do their job if they’re clogged with leaves and other debris.

After the trees have finished shedding their leaves, get up on a ladder and clean that stuff out. Plug the top of the downspout with a rag first to keep debris from going down the spout, and wear heavy gloves to protect your hands.

Reader’s Digest Association’s “1001 Do-It-Yourself Hints & Tips” recommends removing the debris with a plastic sand shovel or garden trowel, or you can fashion a scoop from a plastic milk jug. Dump the debris into a bucket instead of pushing it over the lip of the gutter to avoid dirtying the siding, the book suggests.

When the gutter is clean, run some water into it from a garden hose. Clear a clogged downspout with a plumber’s snake or a blast from the hose, working from the bottom up so you don’t compact the clog.

Read more at: http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/realestate/home/sc-home-fall-chores-20121117,0,947494.story

Disclaimer: for information and entertainment purposes only